Author Topic: Remote Rig UK to USA legalities?  (Read 2642 times)

2e1fxw

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Remote Rig UK to USA legalities?
« on: 2013-01-15, 23:06:39 »
Greetings all

Wonder if someone can please answer a quick question, is it against licencing conditions to use a remoterig in the UK (England) from North America?    Thank you

Stu

dj0qn

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Re: Remote Rig UK to USA legalities?
« Reply #1 on: 2013-01-15, 23:35:17 »
Stu,

You are going over the internet, no one knows where you are or could care less!

The operator is always "sitting" where the antenna is located, as far as the license is
concerned. If the station is in the U.S., then you always would identify from the U.S.
and never as if you are somewhere else.

73,
Mitch DJ0QN / K7DX

2e1fxw

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Re: Remote Rig UK to USA legalities?
« Reply #2 on: 2013-01-15, 23:44:06 »
Thanks for the fast reply Mitch, I was thinking the station would be in the UK and would operate it from the USA, from what I have read full licence holders are allowed to operate remotly in the UK but just looking for a good answer, don't want to lose my licence because I put my foot in my mouth on radio and someone hear.


VE3ZI

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Re: Remote Rig UK to USA legalities?
« Reply #3 on: 2013-01-16, 02:13:05 »
Mitch is certainly correct in practical terms - nobody and least of all Ofcom gives a hoot! Correction - some contests disallow remote operation from a different entity.

I am not so sure legally (although I am most certainly not a lawyer). My British licence says that I can set up and operate a station in the United Kingdom, the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man. I am in Canada, so I don't really think I am covered by that wording. But I could easily be wrong.

73 Roger
VE3ZI/G3RBP



dj0qn

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Re: Remote Rig UK to USA legalities?
« Reply #4 on: 2013-01-16, 07:30:26 »
I understood him as stating that he wishes to operate his own home station when he is not
in the U.S. In this case, there are no licensing issues at all.

If someone else uses his U.S. station,they need to have the appropriate U.S. license or reciprocal
privileges. Technically, T/R 61-01 does not cover remote operation, it was conceived for physical
reciprocal operating, but that is getting off topic and let's not start that conversation again please  ;)

You are right about some contests and even (technically) DXCC awards, but that wasn't the question.
Even then, there is no real way one can know that you are not at the transmitter site unless you let
it be known that you are not.

73,
Mitch DJ0QN / K7DX

2e1fxw

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Re: Remote Rig UK to USA legalities?
« Reply #5 on: 2013-01-17, 01:15:41 »
Hi Mitch

 Just to clarify, the station would be based in the UK and I would remote rig from outside the UK, that's the plan anyway, I can't find anything that doesn't say you can't so I guess it would be ok.  Just looking for clarification.

Thank you

dj0qn

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Re: Remote Rig UK to USA legalities?
« Reply #6 on: 2013-01-17, 07:43:24 »
No problem, Stu. Either way around is the same.

The point is that as long as you are coming over the internet and not using RF, then you are not
coming under the jurisdiction of any local authority regulating amateur radio where you are visiting.
You identify as if you are located at the transmitter of where the station is, not where you physically
are located. The point is that only where the RF is generated is where one must have an appropriate license.

73,
Mitch DJ0QN / K7DX

2e1fxw

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Re: Remote Rig UK to USA legalities?
« Reply #7 on: 2013-01-17, 16:20:54 »
That makes sense, thank you Mitch thats great, no more worries :)