Author Topic: RemoteRig over Cellular Network  (Read 5933 times)

w9ac

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Re: RemoteRig over Cellular Network
« Reply #15 on: 2017-04-15, 22:56:37 »
Mitch,

Thanks for the links.  In one of the links, you indicate that Mode 7 is 100MB/hour. Mode 7 is 16 kHz, Linear, 12-bit (180 kbps).  I normally use 2 channels at 8 kHz, Linear, 12-bit.  But that mode shows 130 kbps which is not half of Mode 7.  So, what is the actual data rate using Mode 2 (8k,12,Lin), with "Audio Dual-Rx" enabled for 2-channel audio?  The same as Mode 7 with Audio Dual-Rx disabled?  If so, I compute the following:

100MB/hour = 1GB for 10 hours.  My Verizon plan will be 30 GB/month.  30GB = 300 hours.  300 hours/30 (days in a month) = 10 hours per day of 2 channel, 8 kHz, 12-bit coding. 

Paul, W9AC

dj0qn

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Re: RemoteRig over Cellular Network
« Reply #16 on: 2017-04-16, 06:27:22 »
Paul,

Looking in the manual in appendix A, audio quality 2 = 240kbps using dual channel. Yes, this is the
same as audio quality 7 single channel audio. This would take about 100MB per hour, excluding serial
ports and overhead. So your calculations are correct.

I honestly can recommend that you try a lower audio quality to see if you can tell any difference. I have
my stations set at 0 without any noticeable difference on SSB or CW. I am not an audio freak, but I
still suggest you also try a lower one just for comparison.

73,
Mitch DJ0QN / K7DX

w9ac

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Re: RemoteRig over Cellular Network
« Reply #17 on: 2017-04-16, 13:42:27 »
Mitch,

Many thanks for confirming.  This should work out well with Verizon's 30 GB plan.

Paul, W9AC

w9ac

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Re: RemoteRig over Cellular Network
« Reply #18 on: 2017-04-25, 14:02:14 »
Here's a quick update after last week's installation of Verizon's "LTE Internet Installed" service...

The install went fast and smooth.  The antenna is up on a mast at about 10 feet above ground and getting 3/6 bars of signal strength that translates to the mid-acceptable dBm input level.  Speed tests show approximately 12 Mbps download and 10 Mbps upload.  Ping times are definitely longer with this service over DSL and it's more erratic.  From my home to the site about 30 miles away, I see ping times range from 60 ms. to 300 ms.  With DSL, I was seeing 40ms. to 80 ms.     

The good news is the IP operates just like any cable or DSL ISP in that a public IP releases and renews every few days, making it possible to use any dynamic DNS service.  If this had not worked, Verizon no longer allows the purchase of a static public IP for personal accounts.  If you want a static IP, it's USD $500 but now you must upgrade the service to a more expensive commercial account.  So far, my dynamic DNS has been tracking the rolling IP just fine.  One nice feature of Verizon's router is that it allows for the dynamic DNS service to be polled right from the router; a client program on a PC isn't necessary.  I have accessed the site using RealVNC, TeamViewer, and the client-server programs like PsTRotator all work fine. 

I have NOT yet placed the K3 and RemoteRig at the site.  The K3 is being updated with Elecraft's mods so there won't be an opportunity to try it for another few weeks.  Of concern to me is the great variance in ping time and how that will affect CW.  More to come...

Paul, W9AC 
« Last Edit: 2017-04-25, 14:05:08 by w9ac »

w9ac

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Re: RemoteRig over Cellular Network
« Reply #19 on: 2017-05-05, 03:47:17 »
Further update...

The Elecraft K3 is back at the remote site.  After a day of testing, CW timing over the Verizon 4G/LTE network is excellent and so far, better than the bonded DSL circuit at its best. 

When I logged into the remote site a few days ago, I noticed that signal strength as reported by the Verizon router was only 2/5 bars.  At the time of installation, it was 4/5 bars.  Here's what happened:  The main Verizon site is about 3 miles away from us.  That site went down a few days after the installation.  The site with 2/5 bars comes from Crawford, FL, another 7 miles away.

The 4G router will not conduct another site survey until signal metrics drop below an amount determined in a setup menu.  If 2/5 bars are "good enough," there it stays even if a stronger 4G cell site comes back on line.  I think common cell phones do the same, only we see it much more active in a roaming/mobile environment.  There's a certain level of hysteresis to avoid rapidly switching between cell sites with smaller changes in RF and SNR level. 

Once we drop the towers on the base piers, we'll move the 4G antenna to the 100 ft. self-supporting tower and attach it about 30 ft. off the ground.  That height will give us line-of-site to the main and secondary cell sites.  The odds of both cell sites going down are much smaller than for a single site, especially if Verizon's cell sites are connected in a SONET fiber ring.

We're now into three weeks of service and the Dynamic DNS service has been tracking the public IP changes just fine.  The final test occurred with the K3/RemoteRig and thankfully, it's working as planned.

"Crane day" is June 21.  We're almost QRV again.

Paul, W9AC

VE3VEE

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Re: RemoteRig over Cellular Network
« Reply #20 on: 2017-05-24, 19:01:36 »

The 4G router will not conduct another site survey until signal metrics drop below an amount determined in a setup menu.  If 2/5 bars are "good enough," there it stays even if a stronger 4G cell site comes back on line. 


Paul, would the router connect to the stronger signal after rebooting?

Marvin VE3VEE

w9ac

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Re: RemoteRig over Cellular Network
« Reply #21 on: 2017-05-24, 19:07:33 »
Yes, after a reboot, a survey is initiated and looks for best signal quality.  But if the current locked-on cell site goes down and a backup site is detected with signal quality above the acceptable threshold, then it will stay there until the next reboot -- or if that cell site goes down it will then lock onto another.  So, it's important in this case to periodically poll the router for the current cell site.  The router report shows detailed signal quality, cell site, and direction from the antenna.

Paul, W9AC