Author Topic: Update: How does control RRC know 'how' to contact the radio RRC over internet  (Read 4594 times)

K7FD

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Hi All...

My question is: how does the control unit know how to contact the radio unit sitting out my router in my shack? What setting(s) specifies this?

I have been successful connecting the 2 units, communicating over my home router, and controlling the TS-480SAT. I have not, however, been successful (yet!) connecting to the radio RRC from the control RRC away from the shack.

After testing the set up locally in the shack, I reset the control RRC to DHCP and entered my DynDNS address in SIP contact field. My router at home is an Netgear Range Max 240 wireless router. All port forwarding numbers have been double checked; in addition, I added 192.168.1.228 to my DMZ...

If anyone has been down the road and has any ideas, it would be greatly appreciated!!

73 John K7FD

« Last Edit: 2011-07-15, 23:37:45 by K7FD »

W6SA

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DynDNS is how it knows.  If you have tried putting the Radio unit in the DMZ at any time and then went to port forwarding be sure you cancelled the DMZ setting.  It won't work with both of them active.  Are you able to see the webpage for the Radio unit over the Internet?  If not you may have to change port 80 to something else like 8080 or 800.

I saw a post regarding setting up DynDNS on your router versus on the Radio Unit.  I got the impression that this caused a problem and should only be set up on one or the other.  Setting on the radio unit allows you to specify a time frame for how often you want the IP tested to be sure it hasn't changed.  If you haven't already installed the utility for automatically updating the IP which is available on the DynDNS site you need to do that.  You only need it at the shack end.  If you have it at your control end and open it up to check it out you will immediately change the IP to whatever it is at the site you are logged into.  Not a good thing.  Don't ask how I know...

Good luck and 73 de Walt, W6SA

K7FD

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I am able to access the radio RRC over the web using the Dyndns.org address, no problem with that. At this point, I do have port forwarding set up for the services BUT ALSO have 192.168.1.228 in DMZ. You say I can't have both...so I will remove port forwarding and leave DMZ setting. Originally, I just had port forwarding set up but when I couldn't connect from the outside, I enabled the DMZ in desperation  :-\

One note, my current Netgear router (several years old) has no setting to disable SIP ALG. From what I read, this needs to be disabled. I'm wondering if I should get a new router, say a LinkSys E1200, that has the ability to disable SIP ALG?

Regarding DynDNS, yes I have it enabled in the Netgear router...and also in the radio RRC. I will disable it in the Netgear configuration and leave it only in the radio RRC...

But I'm almost out the door to get another router  :o

dj0qn

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Hi John,

It looks like you placed your router's IP address in the DMZ, but you need to put the RRC's address
in there.

Your router likely does not have SIP ALG if you can't turn it off. Otherwise, if you need some help,
let me know. I can send you a checklist I wrote for setting these up if you drop me a mail directly
(your e-mail address is unlisted) to dj0qn (at) arrl.net.

73,
Mitch DJ0QN / K7DX

K7FD

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That was a typo on the original post. I added 192.168.1.228 to the DMZ...

K7FD

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Tonight I re-did my DynDNS; it appears my first attempt at setting this up ended up incorrectly by using my ISP's IP instead of the IP of the radio RRC 192.168.1.228 -- I did not realize I had to type in the radio RRC IP and took the default IP address (the ISP) shown in error.

Now when I do an NSLOOKUP on my DynDNS name, I get 192.168.1.228 as a response. I believe this is what the control RRC (SIP contact) is looking for...

In addition, after reading through other posts about ISP port blocking, I changed all the port addressing except for 11000 and 12000 port numbers.

Tomorrow I will attempt another remote session from an available router 12 miles north of my shack...

I've been careful to follow the manual/pdf but hopefully I am beginning to understand what I am reading, hi!

73 John K7FD

dj0qn

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John,

The 192.168.1.228 address is an internal address, and can not be reported by DynDNS.

Indeed, the DynDNS must report one single external IP address for ALL devices in your network.
These are separated within your network by using the port numbers. DynDNS doesn't know or care
about these numbers.

Again my offer; drop me a mail directly and I will send you a check list that will help you out.

73,
Mitch DJ0QN / K7DX

K7FD

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OK on DynDNS, Mitch. I dropped you an email yesterday morning...I'll try another today

dj0qn

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Thanks, John, it was received this time and responded to. Must have got
caught by the spam gods the last time around.

73,
Mitch DJ0QN / K7DX

K7FD

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Success! I have made a remote connection between control RRC and radio RRC...the TS-480SAT works beautifully! Special thanks to Mitch DJ0QN for his assistance...on this forum and in emails.

The key(s) to getting connected over the internet was changing the SIP port to something other than 5060. I also changed the web and telnet ports to something other than 80 and 23. After the port numbers were changed, it was an easy connection between the control RRC and radio RRC using DynDNS.com...

I had my first remote QSO on 40 meters...from my workplace 12 miles from my radio shack...via my 40m sloper at home! This certainly opens up a lot of new operating scenarios for ham radio!!

Also special thanks to CQ Magazine and this months article on www.remoterig.com by Martti OH2BH...

73 John K7FD